Studying Environmental Sciences gave me the opportunity to understand how complex global problems are cross-discipline and can affect different systems around the world. I have always been motivated by policy relevant questions that need to address natural and social systems complexity to provide useful responses.

As a researcher, I have been able to look at some of these questions, every time opening up new research areas to pursue. A PhD in Environmental Economics touhgt me a lot on decision making in socioeconomic systems, while posing some new questions about wealth distribution, access to resources and user rights. My experience as a post-doc researcher at University of Santiago de Compostela and at the Basque Centre for Climate Change (BC3) introduced me to Climate Change and the challenges for natural and social systems to  adapt. As a visiting researcher at Bren School for Environmental Science and Policy (USA), I was able to join a group of fishery experts at UCSB and learned about the solutions to sustainable fishery management in many systems that are implemented around the world. From this experience, I was highly motivated by the problems affecting the oceans, where important gaps for climate adaptation decision-making exist. I decided then that I wanted to focus on marine resources and livelihoods as a way to understand how society could and should respond to Climate Change.

Following this path, I am currently leading the project CLOCK: Climate Adaptation to shifting stocks, funded by the European Research Council through a ERC Starting Grant. For facing this new challenge, I have joined the University of Vigo, where I expect to further develop my scientific career.

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